Blog Entry

One-Minute Lectures?!

11 comments

David Shieh’s “These Lectures are Gone in 60 Seconds: Minute-long talks find success at a community college” got forwarded to us instructional designers by our supervisor recently. (http://chronicle.com/free/v55/i26/26a00102.htm) This issue had come up because of a request by some departments for a presentation that would cover some topics that are critical for e-learning: new technologies, e-learning quality, accessibility, intellectual property, and some design principles. They wanted this all in a short time.

Knowing how much hand-holding goes on for most course builds, I was skeptical that we could do a decent job of this in a short time even in the best of situations, without overwhelming the faculty audience. This was a gentle touché to my stance.

Micro Lectures

So back to the concept. Apparently, these very brief lectures may run from about a minute to about three minutes in the mini-format. At the very high end, 20-minute lectures are the limit. Here, information creators condense materials dealing with “little more than (the introduction of) key terms and concepts” and maybe instructor showcasing. These are created to capture attention for learners with hyper-short attention spans.

I’ve seen a few of these at my university. One was for a stress management course, and a trainer showed brief ways to relax at a desk. These involved ways to stretch and relieve muscle tensions without leaving the cubicle.

Restated: These micro-lectures are not about addressing depth or complexity. They’re not about building patience. They’re not about growing expertise.

The Tips for Building One-Minute Lectures

In the above article’s sidebar, David Penrose at SunGard Higher Education who developed San Juan College’s microlectures, offers five steps to create these brief lectures. His ideas are sound…and made better because of Step 4:

“4. Design an assignment to follow the lecture that will direct students to readings or activities that allow them to explore the key concepts. Combined with a written assignment, that should allow students to learn the material.”

This concept can easily become a point of friction in e-learning given the traditionalism of the professoriate. That said, few have anything against some “zing” in the learning, and I think that that’s what these brief video lectures are about.

Comments

Eruditio Loginquitas 5 years, 4 months ago

Hello, Rakesh: Thanks for your comment. It would be great to hear about your experiences with this. Please feel free to elaborate. What feedback have you gotten from students?

I've only had a few experiences with these brief "lectures." I think I included everything I know about them in the short post above. :)

Fris Arvz 5 years, 4 months ago

Huh??? Is it really possible? The fastest discussion I've ever attended last for 15 minutes (it was the fastest yet effective discussion I ever heard).

What can a person learn i a minute?

zakaria 5 years, 4 months ago

Hi

one minute lecture is very useful for the student.

Henry 5 years, 4 months ago

1 minute lectures ???? No way! What on earth are you meant to learn in 60 seconds? Good for students though...

msn indir 5 years, 4 months ago

This concept can easily become a point of friction in e-learning given the traditionalism of the professoriate. That said, few have anything against some “zing” in the learning, and I think that that’s what these brief video lectures are about.

Tom 5 years, 3 months ago

Traditional lectures are well beyond the attention span of most students and are often drawn out to fill an allotted time schedule. Accepting that short lectures could be of benefit would be hard for the more traditional colleges.

Eruditio Loginquitas 5 years, 3 months ago

Hello, Fris, Zakaria, Henry, Indir and Tom: I appreciate your comments which show that students may well prefer briefer lectures. It helps to have more of a student view. I think faculty become more set in their expectations, and that can make things difficult in terms of student-friendly instructional design. Student voices are so important in this process.

bajar de peso 5 years, 3 months ago

I am a fan of short lectures as well!

padel 2 years, 2 months ago

Hello

one minute lecture is very useful for the student.

Diminished Value 2 years ago

I’ve seen a few of these at my university. One was for a stress management course, and a trainer showed brief ways to relax at a desk. These involved ways to stretch and relieve muscle tensions without leaving the cubicle.

Robert Teaching English 1 year, 10 months ago

Very interesting concept here -- being an instructor myself, I may have to try and make use of these brief "micro-lectures." I actually teach some courses with students with dyslexia and ADHD and this may prove to be quite handy. I think it's important regardless to have a focus to your presentations and this technique requires you to really narrow down and hone in on exactly what the most important take-aways are from the lecture, making sure that the audience only gets what's needed for immediate action.

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